Captivating Natalie Dormer { Natalie-Dormer.com }Your best online source for all things British Acress Natalie Dormer

Welcome to Captivating Natalie Dormer one of the largest and longest running sources dedicated to British Actress Natalie Dormer. Natalie is best known for her role as Anne Boleyn in Showtime's The Tudors but you also may recognise her from Casanova, Game of Thrones and The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Parts 1 & 2. Currently, you can find Natalie as Mrs. Appleyard in the TV Miniseries Picnic at Hanging Rock, as Sofia in In Darkness, as Onica in the TV Series The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance and as Magda in the TV Series Penny Dreadful: City of Angels

Captivating aims to be your most up-to-date and comprehensive source for Natalie. Check back daily for all the latest news, photos and info. Thank you for visiting the site and supporting Natalie and her career!

July 06, 2018   /   Claudia   /   In Darkness (2017) Movie Productions News

After being frustrated with the limited roles she was being offered, the actress co-wrote her new film with her partner Anthony Byrne.

In an Earl’s Court apartment block hallway, Natalie Dormer gestures for me to sit down. “Get yourself over to the stairs,” she smiles, “the red Hitchcockian stairs.”

The film she is shooting is In Darkness, a contemporary thriller – as if her nod to Hitchcock hadn’t already given that away – about a pianist named Sofia. Played by Dormer, the visually impaired Sofia gets entangled in a murder case when her upstairs neighbour is killed.

Today’s scene sees Dormer fumbling her way into the building’s lift, white cane in hand, with the creepy Marc (played by Ed Skrein) – who may or may not be the killer – in pursuit.

Dormer, the fiercely intelligent and striking-looking 36-year-old, who rose to fame on The Tudors and Game of Thrones, has spent days with people at the Royal National Institute for the Blind, getting “a crash course in visual impairment” to help perfect her character.

Intriguingly, Dormer is also the co-writer of In Darkness, scripting it with the director – and her off-screen partner – Anthony Byrne.

“There was a drought of intelligent thrillers when we started writing this seven years ago,” she says, when we retire upstairs to chat, sitting at the dining room table on the set of Sofia’s apartment.

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July 06, 2018   /   Claudia   /   News Picnic at Hanging Rock (2018) Television Productions

“You’re a woman. You’re a sensual creature are you not?” demands Natalie Dormer, fierce blue eyes narrowing. You could imagine Dormer delivering the line as shrewd seductress Margaery Tyrell in Game Of Thrones, or The Tudors’ Anne Boleyn, but here, she’s saying it to an interviewer in an EastEnders-themed room of BBC Broadcasting House. (There’s a replica of the Queen Vic pub sign hanging above the door.)

Dormer has just been asked about the surprising erotic voyeurism in Picnic At Hanging Rock, a six-part adaptation of Joan Lindsay’s 1967 novel about the disappearance of a group of Australian schoolgirls at the turn of the nineteeth century. Adapted by playwright Beatrix Christian and showrun by director Larysa Kondracki, it’s a story largely about women, largely told by women. Why should that fact make the eroticism surprising? Dormer fires back “Why can’t a female story be erotic and sensual?”

“God, it’s overdue to see that sort of storytelling, isn’t it? To see sex and sexuality through a female gaze—female producers, directors, writers—as opposed to coming from a male gaze. For me, for that reason alone, it’s refreshing.”

“We all,” Dormer looks around the room at her half a dozen interviewers, all women save for one man, “all but one” she corrects with a laugh, “—you gentlemen have your own version of it—can remember what it is to be an adolescent girl grappling with puberty and the intensity of the bodily changes and the emotional changes… if you put young pubescent girls, with their hormones going everywhere, in a contained space, that is the reality of the situation.”

Dormer is keen not to put too much significance on Picnic At Hanging Rock being led by writers and directors who are women. On the press circuit for the show here in the UK, in the US and Australia, the focus on its gender provenance has obviously become something of an irritant.

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July 04, 2018   /   Mel   /   News

After being frustrated with the limited roles she was being offered, the actress co-wrote her new film with her partner Anthony Byrne 

In an Earl’s Court apartment block hallway, Natalie Dormer gestures for me to sit down. “Get yourself over to the stairs,” she smiles, “the red Hitchcockian stairs.”

The film she is shooting is In Darkness, a contemporary thriller – as if her nod to Hitchcock hadn’t already given that away – about a pianist named Sofia. Played by Dormer, the visually impaired Sofia gets entangled in a murder case when her upstairs neighbour is killed.

Today’s scene sees Dormer fumbling her way into the building’s lift, white cane in hand, with the creepy Marc (played by Ed Skrein) – who may or may not be the killer – in pursuit.

Dormer, the fiercely intelligent and striking-looking 36-year-old, who rose to fame on The Tudors and Game of Thrones, has spent days with people at the Royal National Institute for the Blind, getting “a crash course in visual impairment” to help perfect her character.

Intriguingly, Dormer is also the co-writer of In Darkness, scripting it with the director – and her off-screen partner – Anthony Byrne.

“There was a drought of intelligent thrillers when we started writing this seven years ago,” she says, when we retire upstairs to chat, sitting at the dining room table on the set of Sofia’s apartment.

She cites films like Guillaume Canet’s Tell No One and Christopher Nolan’s Insomnia remake as rarities in the field. “And then when Denis Villeneuve popped up and did Prisoners, we were like ‘Exactly!’”

With a cast that also includes Joely Richardson and Emily Ratajkowski, Dormer is keen for the film to paint the nation’s capital in authentic brush strokes. “I get frustrated about not seeing the real London on camera. You either see candy box London, if it’s a [Richard] Curtis movie, or you see rough estate gangster [films]… you don’t see central cosmopolitan middle-class London, which is textured.”

For Dormer, creating her own script is a first – well, since her days at the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art. “Like most drama students I wrote a play while I was at drama school and thought I could write,” she says.

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July 04, 2018   /   Mel   /   News

LONDON (Reuters) – “Game of Thrones” actress Natalie Dormer gets in front as well as behind the camera for thriller “In Darkness”, a movie she began writing nearly 10 years ago frustrated by the lack of “three dimensional” roles for women.

The 36-year-old, also known for television series “The Tudors” and “The Hunger Games” films, stars as blind pianist Sofia, who hears her upstairs neighbour being murdered, leading her into a dark world of war criminals.

Dormer started the script in 2009 but says things have changed on screen since then with female-lead films in movies such as “Black Swan” and “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”.”It was pre this revolution we’ve had in wanting fully fleshed out three-dimensional flawed women as our protagonists. I think we can, storytelling wise, see that wave – slower than we would have wanted but it’s happening,” she said in an interview.

“Behind the camera is a much more pertinent question … If it took me seven years to get my independent movie shot it’s … the female writers, directors cinematographers who are trying to get their stuff made. Now that we won’t see for years.”

Women made up 18 percent of writers, directors, producers, editors and cinematographers who worked on the 250 biggest grossing movies in the United States last year, little changed from 1998, according to the Centre for the Study of Women in Television and Film.

Dormer shares the film’s writing credits with her fiance Anthony Byrne, who directs. Both are producers.

“I’m concerned and invested in everybody doing their job in that room which is a completely different thing to being an actor.

“To be perfectly honest I love the team sport element of it and I got a real kick out of it.”

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July 03, 2018   /   Mel   /   News

“Good storytelling is genderless,” says the Picnic at Hanging Rock actress.

Natalie Dormer has insisted that male viewers shouldn’t feel excluded by female-fronted TV and film projects, like her new series Picnic at Hanging Rock.

BBC Two’s adaptation of Joan Lindsay’s novel features a female-led cast and had a female writer, with four out of the six episodes also directed by women.

“It has a different tone via osmosis, by being female-led,” Dormer told press, including Digital Spy, of the story of three adolescent girls and their governess, who mysteriously go missing in the Australian bush in 1900.

“God, it’s overdue to see that sort of storytelling, isn’t it? And to see sex and sexuality through a female gaze – female producers, writers, directors – as opposed to it coming through a male gaze. So for me, for that reason alone, it’s refreshing.

“But it’s still just, at its core, great storytelling, and should interest either gender or any of the sexualities or whatever your preferences in life are.

“I think we’re in an evolution at the moment where hopefully, in ten years’ time, this will all be so much more irrelevant, because it will naturally be happening – the parity or the quality of what stories we see in gender, in front of and behind the camera.

“Sexuality, ethnicity – hopefully we won’t need to talk about it so much in the future.”

Dormer – who plays Hester Appleyard, the enigmatic Headmistress of Appleyard College, in Picnic at Hanging Rock – insisted that “good storytelling is genderless”.

“It’s [just] good storytelling. It’s about humanity,” she said. “So, whatever you are.

“I wouldn’t want to say anything that ostracises a male audience. Because, if I can sit down and watch a hardcore Vietnam War film and enjoy it, then I expect my brother or best male friends to be able to sit down and enjoy Picnic.”

Picnic at Hanging Rock was originally published in 1967, with its surprising climax (no spoilers here!) sparking much discussion and analysis. The story, according to Dormer, “refuses, almost, to be contained as one genre”.

“Larysa [Kondracki, directors of episodes 1-3] calls it an enchanted chiller,” she said. “It has elements of psychological thriller, verging maybe on horror in some places. There’s really strong comedy in places.

“There’s romance in there. There’s adventure. There is a mystery that fundamentally is the anchor of the story. And that is what I appreciate of it, and hopefully different demographics will respond to that. It has this ability to morph as you watch it, which again, I think is just a testament to very strong writing.”

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July 03, 2018   /   Mel   /   News

The 36-year-old actor said though writing the psychological thriller “In Darkness” with Byrne was a challenging experience, she has “huge respect” for him as a director and a partner.

LONDON: “Game of Thornes” star Natalie Dormer has said she will not be teaming up with her fiance Anthony Byrne for writing another film.

The 36-year-old actor said though writing the psychological thriller “In Darkness” with Byrne was a challenging experience, she has “huge respect” for him as a director and a partner.

“Couples say terrible things to each other that you would never say to your best friend. We learned very quickly that we couldn’t write in the same room. Doors got slammed at various points and I wouldn’t necessarily rush into writing with Anthony again, but I have huge respect for him,” Dormer said.

The actor plays blind pianist Sofia in the film, which also features Emily Ratajkowski and Ed Skrein.

According to Femalefirst, Dormer said that as part of her training for the role she also spent time at Royal National Institute of Blind People.

“You’re never going to fully appreciate what it’s like because you have the safety net there – your eyes – but I have to do a massive shout out to the RNIB because they gave me my cane lessons and showed me how to walk up and down the street and navigate around my own house. You realise you know a lot just by memory and sound,” Dormer said.

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June 04, 2018   /   Claudia   /   News Picnic at Hanging Rock (2018) Television Productions

Amazon Prime’s latest limited series is a new twist on a classic—a genuine reimagining. Widely considered to be one of the best Australian novels of all time, Joan Lindsay‘s 1967 Picnic at Hanging Rock is the story of three young women and a teacher from upper-class Appleyard College who mysteriously vanish from a picnic at the titular landmark on Valentine’s Day 1900.

The novel has been adapted multiple times for the stage, and notably for the screen by director Peter Weir in 1975. Weir’s film is critically revered, and its influence has touched creations as varied as the films of Sofia Coppola to Damon Lindelof‘s acclaimed series The Leftovers to the work of fashion designers.

From showrunner Larysa Kondracki and writers Beatrix Christian and Alice Addison, Amazon’s six-hour miniseries has much of what made the Weir film so powerful—nightmarish, quietly horrifying qualities and haunting mystery—but thanks in part to its expansive length and scope, there’s much more on the table this time ’round: this Picnic has provocative, sexy romance, black humor, and an edgy, universal tale of identity and coming into one’s own. It’s suddenly quite timely too—a unique meditation on femininity and girlhood released mere months after the dawn of #MeToo.

The series stars Game of Thrones‘ Natalie Dormer as unremittingly strict headmistress Hester Appleyard. Lily Sullivan (Mental) co-stars as Miranda Reid, and Lola Bessis (Thirst Street) plays young governess Madameoiselle Dianne de Poitiers.

Parade spoke with Dormer and other members of the cast and crew about this new take on a classic, its relevance amidst the backdrop of the #MeToo movement, and equality in the entertainment industry and beyond.

Because the 1975 film is so esteemed, did you feel pressure to live up to it?

Bessis: I love the ’75 film so much, and I said that the first time I talked with Larysa on Skype, but she said, “Don’t worry, this is going to be really different.”

Kondracki: Absolutely, but these scripts are so different. It’s much more about who these girls were. Ours is a little darker, too. The scripts are very truthful to the book.

Dormer: We have six hours to delve into the novel in ways Weird couldn’t in two hours.

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June 04, 2018   /   Claudia   /   News

Natalie Dormer knows you want to ask her about Game Of Thrones. Sure, she’s working on other projects, and she’s played a part in many a franchise (The Tudors and The Hunger Games among them), but the Game Of Thronesobsessives always want more (and rightfully so). She can feel the vibration of my question forming, and, even though her character, Margaery Tyrell, has already been killed off the much-loved drama, Dormer is always ready to offer her own opinions as to where the princes, queens, and dragon-slayers on the show will end up.

When we sit down together at Bustle HQ, Dormer admits she’s worried about Sansa (“I love her journey as a character”), she wants Cersei to have a “massive revelation of self,” and she tacks on the exceptionally juicy tidbit that she knows how it all ends. “They’ve been shooting a lot of battle sequences… it’s the fight to the finish,” she says, letting the statement lie, with an unmistakeable emphasis on the word “finish.” Though Dormer loved her time on Game Of Thrones and is happy to have been a part of the series, she’s beyond ready to move on.

No longer satisfied with the stories men have projected onto women in the industry, Dormer is among those actresses and storytellers who is taking matters into her own hands. In one of her post-Game Of Thrones projects, In Darkness (in theaters now), Dormer plays Sofia, a blind musician who, after she hears the murder of a neighbor, is thrown into the gritty underbelly of London, complete with war criminals, fight sequences, and plenty of intrigue. While playing a character like Sofia would be a boon for many actresses, Dormer took it a step further — she wrote In Darkness, too, along with director Anthony Byrne.

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May 29, 2018   /   Claudia   /   News Picnic at Hanging Rock (2018) Television Productions

Peter Weir’s 1975 film “Picnic at Hanging Rock,” much like the geologic formation named in its title, casts a very long shadow. Based on the 1967 novel of the same name by Joan Lindsay, the movie adaptation tells the story of three young women and a teacher from Appleyard College, who go missing during a Valentine’s Day outing in 1900.

Considered a masterpiece of Australian filmmaking and an achievement in Weir’s early career, the movie created a haunting Victorian aesthetic that is still referenced in films, fashion, and other art forms to this day. Because of this impact, the movie looked as if it would be one of the few classics that would remain untouched by the latest wave of remakes and reboots. Then a group of women came along to change that.

Showrunner and director Larysa Kondracki and star Natalie Dormer spoke to IndieWire about why they dared to tackle “Picnic at Hanging Rock” as a limited series for a new generation.

1. The Series Avoids Weir Altogether

Kondracki herself is an ardent fan of the original film, which is why it took some convincing for her to sign up for the series.

“[The script] was sent to me. I said, ‘Absolutely not. I don’t wanna touch Peter Weir,’” she said. “I was like, ‘Are you crazy? No way.’ Everyone said the same thing: That’s such a canonical film, and you’d hate to be disrespectful of it.”

She soon learned, however, that this was not a remake of Weir’s film, but instead went straight to the source material. Writers Beatrix Christian and Alice Addison adapted Lindsay’s novel into a six-part series for television.

“They said, ‘Read it. It’s a reimagining of the book; it’s not the movie,’” said Kondracki. “The second you read the first page and Bea’s writing, you just went, ‘Okay, this is totally different.’”

Dormer added, “The text is there. It seems bizarre that when the original story is so great that it would only have one incarnation. So we take nothing away from the Weir. It has its reverent place. We’re doing something completely different.”

2. The Adaptation Expands on the Girls’ Stories

Of course, adapting Lindsay’s novel is daunting in itself because it’s also considered to be one of the best Australian novels of all time.

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May 15, 2018   /   Claudia   /   Media Archive News

In the thriller In Darkness, Game of Thrones actress Natalie Dormer plays a blind pianist named Sofia who overhears a struggle in the apartment above hers that leads to the death of her neighbor, Veronique (Emily Ratajkowski). It is the start of a journey that leads Sofia into a dangerous world of corruption, hitmen, and the Russian mafia — a world with links to Sofia’s own hidden past.

In Darkness is directed by Anthony Byrne and cowritten by Byrne and Dormer. The film’s cast also includes Joely Richardson (Nip/Tuck, The Tudors), Neil Maskell (Kill List, Humans) and James Cosmo (Games of Thrones, Wonder Woman).

Source: EW

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